John Chesser

Mecklenburg County government
Enterprise Management Analyst

Biography

Before joining Mecklenburg County government, John was a Senior Analyst at the UNC Charlotte Urban Institute. During his time at the institute, his work included: research and analysis of regional trends in demographics and development; data dashboard development; project management; public process development and facilitation; data systems implementation; remote training and support; and web communications. Until 2008, he managed the institute’s project office for the Transportation Information Management System (TIMS), for western North Carolina. Through the TIMS program, he has extensive operational planning experience in public school transportation, student assignment and redistricting.

John chairs the Davidson, N.C., Planning Board and Board of Adjustment.

Education

M.A. Geography, UNC Charlotte, urban and regional analysis concentration
B.A. Geography, UNC Chapel Hill

Expertise

Urban development and demographic change; geographic information systems (GIS); web communications; school redistricting, pupil assignment; pupil transportation and school operational planning

Articles

  • plancharlotte.org
    Aug 20, 2014
    Urban designers Keihly Moore and Alex Borisenko are proposing a series of urban design retrofits, many of them nominated by readers. Here is a suggestion for Camden Avenue near popular lunch spot Price's Chicken Coop. (Images: Completeblocks.com)
  • ui.uncc.edu
    Aug 20, 2014
    Urban designers Keihly Moore and Alex Borisenko are proposing a series of urban design retrofits, many of them nominated by readers. Here is a suggestion for Camden Avenue near popular lunch spot Price's Chicken Coop. (Images: Completeblocks.com)
  • ui.uncc.edu
    Aug 14, 2014
    Kayaking and canoeing are fun and healthy ways to enjoy the outdoors. A great stream in the N.C. Piedmont that’s now easily accessible is Hitchcock Creek in Rockingham, about 70 miles east of Charlotte. (Photo Crystal Cockman)
  • ui.uncc.edu
    Jul 15, 2014
    One hundred years ago, North Carolina had a population of about 2.5 million people, and more than nine out of 10 residents were native Tar Heels. Today, with a population of nearly 10 million, more than 4 million residents were born in another state or country. (Photo: Nancy Pierce)
  • ui.uncc.edu
    Jun 19, 2014
    Want to know which of the state’s public high schools have above-average SAT scores? A map of income is a good place to start. (Image: John Chesser)
  • ui.uncc.edu
    May 15, 2014
    Interactive data dashboards track Gaston County trends in demographics, economy, education, health and quality of life. (Graph: ui.uncc.edu)
  • ui.uncc.edu
    May 01, 2014
    Charlotte never experienced the dramatic housing bubble seen in other places in the country, but the local market is still under its August 2007 peak as measured by the Case-Shiller Index. Explore our data dashboard to see Charlotte's highs and lows compared with places like Atlanta and Denver. (Graphic: UNC Charlotte Urban Institute)
  • plancharlotte.org
    Apr 03, 2014
    Since 2010, the home counties of Charlotte and Raleigh have accounted for nearly half of all population growth in North Carolina. Just 10 N.C. counties tallied nearly 80 percent of the state's increased population. (Image: John Chesser, Tableau maps)
  • ui.uncc.edu
    Apr 03, 2014
    Since 2010, the home counties of Charlotte and Raleigh have accounted for nearly half of all population growth in North Carolina. Just 10 N.C. counties tallied nearly 80 percent of the state's increased population. (Image: John Chesser, Tableau maps)
  • ui.uncc.edu
    Mar 13, 2014
    Charlotte's metro has one of the fastest-growing college-educated populations in the U.S. Where exactly do the educated live in Charlotte? As people with college degrees cluster in metros, what does that mean for rural areas? (Graphic: John Chesser)