Cabarrus County

Below are articles about Cabarrus County or about the whole metropolitan region.
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Can innovative interchange plan survive suburbia?

Sign on Eastfield Road reflects opposition among some residents to a proposed apartment project nearby. Photo: Nancy Pierce As the final leg of I-485 nears completion, residents near the Prosperity Church Road interchange are bracing for growth. A 1999 plan calls for an “urban village” there of compact streets and walkable, mixed-use neighborhoods. Will the growth really follow that plan? (Photo: Nancy Pierce)

Cabarrus' Lomax farm faces uncertain future

The Elma C. Lomax Farm in Cabarrus County (2010 photo) has lost county funding. Can it survive as nonprofit? Photo: Nancy Pierce A Cabarrus County-run farm to help fledgling farmers, one of only two in the state, lost county funding, as well as its electricity, July 1. Can the incubator farm survive as a nonprofit? Its many supporters in the region hope so. (Photo: Nancy Pierce)

Big urban gains, rural losses in the Carolinas

Since 2010, the home counties of Charlotte and Raleigh have accounted for nearly half of all population growth in North Carolina. Just 10 N.C. counties tallied nearly 80 percent of the state's increased population. (Image: John Chesser, Tableau maps)

Charlotte-area residents invited to chart the region's future

Charlotte-area residents will have an additional opportunity to voice their opinion on the region’s growth. A fourth Mecklenburg County workshop will be held Oct. 24 at Freedom Park as part of the  “CONNECT Our Future” planning program. (Photo: Nancy Pierce)

As N.C. graduation rates rise, CMS and Wake are tied

Between 2006 and 2013, the rate of N.C. high school students graduating on time (in four years) rose from 68.3 percent to 82.5 percent. The state's two largest districts, Wake and Charlotte-Mecklenburg, now have the same rate, 81 percent. Explore data for all N.C. districts with our interactive dashboards. (Photo: iStock)

Worried about area’s growth? Here’s how to have your say

The CONNECT regional planning program hosts workshops this fall where participants will model growth scenarios. Charlotte area planning and sustainability enthusiasts can have their say about the future of the region in coming weeks by getting involved in two long-range regional planning efforts.

A year later, were tornado lessons learned?

With tornado and storm season on us, what lessons were learned in the year since a sudden tornado blew through Harrisburg and eastern Mecklenburg County, injuring four people and destroying six homes? And what’s been rebuilt? (Photo: Melissa Currie)

A game of homes (and jobs, farms and more)

How can the Charlotte region prepare for the thousands of new jobs and houses expected to come here? RealityCheck2050, part of the CONNECT process, let regional participants develop their own versions of the future. (Photo: Melissa Currie)

Putting a local food twist on suburbia

The Farmstead, a proposed development in Granite Quarry, would tap into the national enthusiasm for local food and local farms by building a suburban subdivision with a farm in the middle and gardens for homeowners. (Photo: Concord Builders)

Regional cooperation at risk?

An implied threat Monday from Charlotte City Council to withdraw support for the proposed Monroe Bypass is more fallout from an increasingly fractious battle over Charlotte’s airport.  And now, that battle might be putting at risk some long-nurtured regional cooperation. (Photo: Nancy Pierce)