Economic development

To stimulate airport area, invest in west Charlotte transit

Charlotte leaders cite Crystal City, outside Washington, as a model for new development they envision west of the airport. But this vision misses what makes Crystal City work: mass transit. (Photo: Mariana Gil/EMBARQ Brasil)

Growing greens indoors to boost local foods, job skills

Just northeast of uptown Charlotte, in a previously abandoned and cluttered warehouse, is Lila's Garden. It's more than a for-profit hydroponic garden. The owners hope it could be a key to revitalizing a struggling neighborhood. (Photo: Selena Skorman)

Gastonia working to lure artists downtown

An artists’ colony in downtown Gastonia? That may sound far-fetched to those who remember Gastonia's textile mill past. But the Community Foundation of Gaston County is working with the nonprofit Artspace to build a project in Gastonia by 2016. (Photo: Nancy Pierce)

A year later, were tornado lessons learned?

With tornado and storm season on us, what lessons were learned in the year since a sudden tornado blew through Harrisburg and eastern Mecklenburg County, injuring four people and destroying six homes? And what’s been rebuilt? (Photo: Melissa Currie)

New name, new money plan for streetcar

Will a new name, a new tie-in to the county’s overall transit plan, and a new funding scheme using no property tax money mean a new outcome for a proposed streetcar expansion project? (Photo: CATS)

Easy access to work? Charlotte’s not atop list

A new study of access to jobs via automobile, across the United States, ranks the Charlotte metro area near the bottom. Unlike simple congestion studies, this one looks at land use as well as the transportation system.  

The measure of a metro

In January, Charlotte had 1.8 million people. Today it has 2.3 million people. And no, there was no airlift of half a million residents from the Rust Belt or anywhere else. How can a city gain a half-million people almost overnight? (Staff photo)

HOT lanes: A hot topic at Huntersville meeting

Huntersville Town Hall was the setting for Wednesday afternoon’s public information meeting about HOT (High Occupancy Toll) lanes proposed on I-77. HOT lanes are a red-hot topic, and citizens were vocal about their concerns. Is the region ready to accept pay-as-you-go highways? (Photo: Melissa Currie)

Neighborhood schools? More city parents are taking a fresh look

Gretchen Gregg, a Madison Park parent, with Gabby, 7, Zane, 3, and River, 1. Photo: Keihly Moore In at least a half-dozen older Charlotte neighborhoods many white, middle-income families avoided sending their children to neighborhood schools with a majority of low-income, minority students.  Some parents are now taking a closer look at those nearby schools. (Photo: Keihly Moore)

Is the Charlotte region ready for another boom?

Times have been tough in the local economy, but it looks as if we’ve finally turned the corner. If growth is starting to make a comeback, exactly where will it be? Is your county ready? (Photo:  U.S. Census Bureau, Public Information Office)