Land development

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South End: From mills to millennials

Imagine it’s 2030 and Charlotte’s popular South End has grown up like other neighborhoods in an increasingly urban and transit-friendly city. What does this area, just on the outskirts of uptown’s skyscrapers, look like? And most importantly, who is living there?

Charlotte homes in on new Eastland Mall project

A failing Eastland Mall in 2008, before the city bought, demolished it. Photo: Nancy Pierce In recent years, many residents in east Charlotte grew weary and frustrated with the city’s unsuccessful efforts to attract a showpiece development to replace the once-popular Eastland Mall.

Charlotte’s parking deck identity crisis: Can a deck be ‘green’?

What with Lyft, Uber, dockless bike-share and electric scooters, urban travel is changing. Even the basic notion of a parking deck now gets more scrutiny. Commentary.

‘Repackaged Urban Renewal’? Research examines starter-home neighborhoods

Google Earth image shows Henderson Oaks Drive is next to a large industrial-use site. Two researchers conclude in a new article that many starter-home subdivisions in Charlotte, often built in industrial areas, saw neighborhood decline.

As possessions expand, so do self-storage businesses

Self-storage facilities used to hide in the shadows, mostly low-slung, metal sheds spread out over a few acres of asphalt. But over the past decade, newer designs mean multistory buildings in visible places. Can these buildings fit into an urban context?

Four proposals emerge to rebuild Eastland Mall site

Eastland Mall skating rink in 2002. Photo: Nancy Pierce What’s next for the old Eastland Mall site? A Charlotte City Council committee heard four proposals from development groups. Here are the proposals.

What’s a UDO? A Place Type? Summit aims to improve public understanding

North Davidson Street in the NoDa neighborhood. Photo: John Chesser Saturday, interested members of the public can attend a free workshop to hear more about the initiative to improve and clarify the ordinances that govern development in Charlotte.

Time for a new vision for Charlotte?

Slide of neighborhood with trees from Ed McKinney presentation to Planning Commission As Charlotte explores how to reorganize and update its development ordinances into one Unified Development Ordinance, the question arises whether the city also needs a new comprehensive plan.

Water for growth? River group raises the alarm

Catawba River in York County, aerial view. Photo: Nancy Pierce Projections are for the Catawba-Wateree River watershed to reach its capacity to provide water to the growing Charlotte region by 2065. With no state laws managing water rights, what happens?

‘This is a symptom of a greater problem.’

A sheriff's deputy stand outside an apartment. Photo: Mary Newsom Each year thousands of people in Charlotte lose their homes to eviction. It’s not just a symptom of larger issues – high child care and transportation costs, rising rents and low wages – but can start a cascade of financial woes.