Explore your world with maps

We know many of you are map-lovers, so we’ve collected a selection of online maps to provoke thought and spark exploration. We’ll regularly feature a recent map of particular interest. We have included a set of maps featuring the Charlotte region, from the UNC Charlotte Urban Institute’s three websites. Below those are links to intriguing maps we found online.

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Articles

  • Charlotte suburbs grow faster as developers seek cheap land

    Development has been sprawling. Places that were once rural now seem urban. Take Fort Mill, S.C., whose population, according to the American Community Survey, has nearly doubled since 2010. Many small towns have grown into bustling suburbs as developers search for large tracts of land to build residential communities. As the population grows, low-cost land and high volume are necessary to meet the regions demand for single family housing.
  • A pedestrian-only plaza in Chester City, UK. Photo by Rachel Bradshaw on Unsplash

    Should Charlotte make one of its major streets pedestrian-only?

    Charlotte has a reputation as a car city, but many of its leaders badly want to promote more biking, walking and transit use. That’s one reason an intriguing idea kept surfacing at this week’s City Council Transportation & Planning Committee meeting: Why not take all the cars off a major street in uptown or South End, creating a pedestrian-only space?
  • A rezoning request near Prosperity Church Road and Interstate 485. Charlotte City Council usually approves rezoning petitions, unless there is strong neighborhood opposition. Photo: Nancy Pierce

    When developers ask for a zoning change, Charlotte usually says yes

    In the past decade, City Council has only denied 27 rezoning petitions out of more than 1,200 filed, according to city records. That means there are more new breweries in Charlotte since 2009 than rezoning petitions turned down.  What’s behind the high approval rate? 
  • The Dairy Queen on Central Avenue that's closing after 70 years. Photo: Google Street View

    Charlotte keeps losing bits of itself as the city grows

    In one of the fastest-growing cities in the U.S., with rising rents and rapid changes in long-established neighborhoods, there’s sure to be a certain amount of churn in the local business scene. Angst and nostalgia are certain to follow. But as it grows and stretches, Charlotte is shedding pieces of its skin, and many don’t like the new identity they see emerging.