Explore your world with maps

We know many of you are map-lovers, so we’ve collected a selection of online maps to provoke thought and spark exploration. We’ll regularly feature a recent map of particular interest. We have included a set of maps featuring the Charlotte region, from the UNC Charlotte Urban Institute’s three websites. Below those are links to intriguing maps we found online.

Featured map

Our maps

Maps we like

  • Where There Are More Single Men Than Women

    There is an interesting spatial distribution of single men and women across the United States.  What makes this even more interesting is the difference when age groups are calculated.  In almost every major metro area in the country, between the ages of 18 and 34, single men outnumber single women.  However, in the age group of 45 to 64, single women tend to outnumber single men in most of the country's cities.
  • America's quietest places

    Looking for a quiet place? This map from the American Association for the Advancement of Science shows the noise levels across the country on an average summer day.
  • The most common job in every state 1978-2014

    What jobs are most common in each state? How does that compare with 1978? And what happened to all the secretaries?

Articles

  • Houses under construction in southwest Charlotte

    Can we build our way out of the housing affordability crisis?

    There’s a growing consensus that if we want to get out of the housing affordability mess we’re in, we need to hear a lot more swinging hammers. Policymakers, developers and housing advocates are all talking about the need to build more, and more of everything: single-family houses, duplexes, triplexes, quadplexes, townhouses and apartments. It’s fast become the conventional wisdom that we need to lower regulatory barriers, streamline the development process and unleash the power of the market on our housing problems by allowing as much density as possible.
  • Blue Line Charlotte

    ‘You can only make roads so big’: Charlotte region launches first transit plan

    Leaders from across the region gathered Monday in a conference room at Charlotte Douglas International Airport with an ambitious goal: Creating a comprehensive plan for public transit, covering a dozen counties and setting the transit agenda for decades.  Called CONNECT Beyond, the 18-month planning effort by the Centralina Council of Governments is, to put it simply, big. The planning area covers 12 counties, in two states, with 17 different transit systems. Previous transit planning efforts have been focused mostly on one county at a time. The goal here is to come up with a plan to coordinate and prioritize projects, as well as funding requests, across the whole region.  “Twenty years from now, I think everyone is going to look back on this as the jumping-off point,” said John Muth, the Charlotte Area Transit System’s chief development officer. 
  • Smokestack emitting gas

    Invisible pollution: Spotlight on clean air coming to Charlotte

    It’s all around us, but we usually can’t smell or see air pollution. A major art piece and a series of events coming to Charlotte this spring could help change that.
  • Richmond Va. bus rapid transit system shelter

    Trains, buses and people: More lessons for Charlotte

    In his recent book, Trains, Buses, People – An Opinionated Atlas of US Transit, Christof Spieler dispenses a refreshly forthright  assessment of 47 of America’s larger systems, including Miami, Atlanta, Austin, Houston, Dallas and other Sun Belt cities. Never before has a publication compared this many cities and transit modes for a mainstream audience. Research included photographs at all locations and interviews with agency staff, elected officials, and advocates. The final product is compressed into a digestible format of full-page maps, abundant infographics and the author’s informed commentary.  Spieler’s opinions derive from several complex factors: political dynamics, funding challenges, planning dilemmas, land use constraints, ridership fluctuations, and conceptual biases all come into play.  He reveals a few winners, but also a lot of losers. Charlotte hovers precariously in between.