Explore your world with maps

We know many of you are map-lovers, so we’ve collected a selection of online maps to provoke thought and spark exploration. We’ll regularly feature a recent map of particular interest. We have included a set of maps featuring the Charlotte region, from the UNC Charlotte Urban Institute’s three websites. Below those are links to intriguing maps we found online.

Featured map

Our maps

Maps we like

  • Mapping the marriage market

    More young people than ever in the U.S. are unmarried, but the ratio of unmarried men to women varies from place to place. The Pew Research Center has put it all together in an interactive map.
  • Mapping the country's dialects

    N.C. State researcher Joshua Katz has created an interactive map of national dialect differences.
  • Mapping the rise of craft beer

    The New Yorker created this interactive map of the craft brew industry in the U.S. Cheers. *Note: This map does not work in Microsoft Internet Explorer and some versions of Google Chrome.
  • Office space vs. parking space

    How much parking space does an office really need?

Articles

  • Three new office buildings - for Ally Financial, Honeywell and Bank of America - in uptown Charlotte. The corner of Stonewall and Tryon was formerly occupied by a Goodyear auto shop and the Charlotte Observer building. Photo: Ely Portillo

    Charlotte just wrapped up its busiest decade ever for uptown development

    The 2010s in uptown Charlotte were a decade with a split personality, starting with an epic crash and swinging to a huge boom that transformed the skyline and left an enormous mark on the city. At the start of the decade, rusting rebar poked up from the EpiCentre, a reminder of a condo project that never got started. Now, those buildings are full and cranes dot the skyline, picking their way around new towers.
  • ArcGIS Urban model of Charlotte

    What will Charlotte look like? This new tool makes it easier to visualize

    The skyline changes every year in a fast-growing city like Charlotte, as parking lots morph into high-rises and humble houses or older building are demolished to make way for the next big thing. It can be tough to keep track of the changes, and even harder to visualize what a proposed development might look like once it’s actually built. A new tool the Charlotte-Mecklenburg Planning Department is planning to adopt soon could make that easier.
  • Construction on Stonewall Street in Charlotte, NC

    What Charlotte needs to grow into a great city

    In more than three decades since she moved to the city, UNC Charlotte professor Deb Ryan has seen a lot of changes. At Charlotte City Council's annual retreat in January, Ryan said she thinks it’s time for the city to raise its expectations of developers.  “We’re not the needy little city we used to be,” Ryan said. 
  • Storm drain lowering Blue Line construction

    ‘Raise our expectations:’ Four takeaways from Charlotte City Council’s retreat

    Charlotte faces a wide range of needs, from affordable housing to more police, bigger parks and better transit, but they all share a similar root cause: growth.  That was one of the main themes at City Council’s annual planning retreat, held this week over four days in Durham at the Washington Duke Inn. There was little anxiety about when the city’s boom might end. Instead, the focus was on ways to manage, change and deal with the side effects of a booming city.  “We’re growing faster than we’re putting in that critical infrastructure around it, and people are feeling the pain,,” said council member Tariq Bokhari.