Explore your world with maps

We know many of you are map-lovers, so we’ve collected a selection of online maps to provoke thought and spark exploration. We’ll regularly feature a recent map of particular interest. We have included a set of maps featuring the Charlotte region, from the UNC Charlotte Urban Institute’s three websites. Below those are links to intriguing maps we found online.

Featured map

Maps we like

Articles

  • Charlotte Area Transit System uptown bus center

    Should Charlotte make its transit system free?

    There’s been a lot of planning lately for Charlotte’s growing transit system, with new rail lines, improved bus service and the first inter-county transit links in the works — as well as questions about how to pay for that growth But one Charlotte City Council member raised a different idea this week at the group’s annual retreat: How about getting rid of fares altogether?
  • Construction on Stonewall Street in Charlotte, NC

    Would Charlotte be better off with less planning?

    Charlotte has a lot of ambitious, master-planned efforts underway right now, but it is the more spontaneous, less-planned areas that have seen truly explosive growth. Consider six areas: Brooklyn Village, Eastland Mall, North Tryon, South End, NoDa and Stonewall Street.
  • Brookhill Village housing Charlotte NC

    Nonprofit charts a new course for troubled South End development

    A new, mixed-income housing development is set to take the place of a long-troubled, low-income housing complex in South End.  Brookhill Village is a paradox: An oasis of affordability in the midst of a booming and fast-gentrifying part of the city, but full of run-down units, many of them boarded up and visibly decaying from the street. Developed in the 1950s by the late C.D. Spangler, a wealthy Charlotte businessman, the complex of one-story buildings occupies 36 acres. Less than two miles away, uptown’s skyline glitters on the horizon.
  • Walking in HunterWood, a Charlotte section of Cotswold.

    Charlotte has 56 “tear-down” neighborhoods: Here’s a portrait of one

    The Walters-brand piano held a commanding spot for decades in Sue and Dale Riley’s den, on Charlotte’s Wonderwood Drive. They bought it for $75, used, for their daughter Megan to learn on when she was 4 or 5 (she’s 47 now). Even when she was grown and came home on weekends or holidays, the piano, ever in need of tuning, came alive again. Until recently. One bright afternoon on my daily walk, I found the aging upright kicked to the curb.